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X1 Princess Margaret Express (1962)

Compiled by Pete Coulman
Originally Posted by Alan Gryfe

February 12, 1962

Service begins on a trial express bus service operating between the Princess Margaret area in central Etobicoke and the Downtown. Buses operate via Kingsway, Anglesey, Royal York, Kingsway, Prince Edward, Park Lawn and Lake Shore to downtown Toronto, looping via Bay, Albert and Yonge, returning via the reverse route.

Three buses provide a 30 minute headway from 7:10 a.m. to 10:10 a.m. and between 3:23 p.m. and 5:25 p.m., Mondays through Fridays. The service is marketed to commuters and shoppers. Fares are 75 cents for adults and 35 cents for children, with no transfer privileges to and from regular TTC routes.

The special X1 designation may indicate that the TTC was considering other specially designated downtown express services had this service been successful. A 1962 Orders & Notice announcing the Princess Margaret Express route to TTC drivers described a unique rollsign exposure and other means to specially identify express buses. The left side of the exposure is labelled “EXPRESS” in black letters against a yellow background. The route exposure is labelled “X-1” in black letters against a white background. The destination exposure is labelled “PRINCESS MARGARET - DOWNTOWN” in white letters against a royal blue background.

The tricolor sign has been replicated below. Buses are also given yellow pennants, “mounted on the open side”, above the entrance doors.

EXPRESS

X-1

PRINCESS MARGARET
D O W N T O W N

Monday to Friday, rush hours only

March 19, 1962

After five weeks, a report to the commission noted that sixty round trips in total had carried 481 passengers. The service had earned just less than half of out-of-pocket expenses and only 23% of the total cost including fixed charges. This data, combined with a survey of homes in the area, suggested that ridership was not likely to increase enough to make this service viable. As a result, on the motion of Commissioner Russell, the Commission instructed that the express service be discontinued after April 19, 1962.

April 20, 1962

Last day of operation.