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Runnymede Station "Easier Access" program:
Elevator construction starts "late November"



The TTC is continuing its “Easier Access” program to install elevators in its subway stations, making the subway system accessible for everyone. The program supports the government of Ontario’s Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. The provincial legislation commits the TTC to achieving a barrier-free transit system by 2025.


By “late November” (perhaps as early as Monday, November 26), crews start building a barrier-free path from the main entrance to all levels of Runnymede Station by installing:

  • three elevators to access the east- and westbound platforms;
  • automatic sliding station-entry doors (on Kennedy Avenue); and
  • better signs and closed-circuit television (CCTV) security cameras along the accessible pathway.

During construction of this project, crews also repair the masonry and upgrade the fire alarms.

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By “late November” (perhaps as early as Monday, November 26), crews start building elevator E1 between the concourse and street level.

They’ll start working in the laneway to the south of the station for elevator E3 in late January, 2019 (by Thursday, January 31, 2019). The western part of the laneway will house the work zone for the elevator 3 shaft “for approximately one year” (or until January 31, 2020). The work zone blocks through-traffic in the laneway between Kennedy Avenue and Runnymede Road. After crews have finished building elevator E3, the contractor will rehabilitate the south masonry wall of the station. Crews will set up scaffolding on northern half of the laneway during this work for “approximately one to three months” (or until April 30, 2020). The contractor will repave the laneway after finishing the project.

In the bus roadway, crews will set up a lay-down area throughout the project until 2020. They’ll start building elevator E2 in the bus roadway in fall 2019 (or by November 15, 2019). The work zone requires the TTC to close the entire bus roadway for three months (or until February 15, 2020), and then partially close the roadway for another six months (or until July 15, 2020). While the bus roadway is closed, TTC passenger will board buses on the street.

Protective construction hoarding will be in place around the work zones and construction vehicles and equipment will access these work zones from both Kennedy Avenue and Runnymede Road.


The TTC will also install public art in Runnymede Station as part of its public art program.

Anonymous Somebody by Elicser Elliott captures the snippets of bustling Bloor West Village lives while standing still. The artworks aims to communicate the story of individual spirt as fresh and relevant to the metabolism of the neighbourhood. The images work as an anchor to a thought or memory for the person viewing it - to commemorate, celebrate, provoke and heal. Not unlike Runnymede, a house that became a community, Anonymous Somebody welcomes all passengers to reframe the characters’ experience as they pass or wait, fluidly transitioning from past lives to present, making the artwork their own.

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Since graduating from Sheridan College’s animation program, Elicser Elliott has amassed a collection of murals and public artworks that have come to help define Toronto’s cityscape. Moving beyond notions of the streets being his only canvas, Elliott has exhibited works at The Art Gallery of Ontario, The Royal Ontario Museum, and LE Gallery. Elliot’s most notable works are a highly improvised collages of soft characters and organic shapes, layered and blended through transparencies. His character work is often mediated by past experiences and relationships while also drawing on the likeness of passers-by to complete his community-based murals.