Update:
TTC "revitalizing" Dufferin Station



Update — Thursday, January 29, 2014, 11:22 a.m.: Starting Monday, February 3, the TTC is closing the east-side stairwell for upgrades until the end of April.


Update — Monday, August 26, 2013, 1:14 p.m.: The TTC is opening the new second exits from the station Wednesday, August 28.


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Since 2010, the TTC has been working on a project to upgrade Dufferin Station. After nearly 45 years, the station infrastructure, including the tiles, stairwells and escalators, needed major work to continue to effectively serve passengers.

Moreover, the station is not accessible to passengers using wheelchairs or other mobility devices or who have some difficulty in walking. At the end of this project, Dufferin Station passengers will find a barrier-free path to all levels of the station.

Although the TTC has not announced the changes, passengers have noticed a different look to the station over the past few months, as the TTC has unveiled new tiles and finishes on the station platforms and station building.

The design firm, spmb — led by Eduardo Aquino and Karen Shanski — incorporated feature art wall and memorial pixel design into the wall finishes of the station to create images inspired by the local community. The Art Design Review Committee for Dufferin Station held a public art competition and selected this group’s concept, “Something Happens Here”. The artists describe it as “a collection of images of the human experiences, environments, and urbanscapes from the neighbourhood, bringing a sense of place to the interior of the station and creating a distinctive experience for TTC customers.

The design includes two different segments.

Feature Art Walls

The designers have translated photographs taken of the Dufferin-and-Bloor area into largely pixelated abstract representations, with 31 “feature art walls” throughout the station — on the platform, concourse and street levels.

Memorial Pixels

More than 100 “memorial pixels” — images and text engraved in metal — will be interspersed throughout the ceramic glazed brick pattern. The images consist of local logos, icons and historical references. The text derives from poems, interviews and other writings about the experiences of the local community.